Logan review: Hugh Jackman's last roar as Wolverine is gripping and violent

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New Delhi:

If you have been the fan of those popular 'X-Men Series', you will be a diehard fan of each and every character of the movie especially Logan who has been the consistent part of the series.

Played by Hugh Jackman, Logan has been a rage amongst the audience. 

And now the makers has come up with another instalment of the franchise - 'Logan'- which is said to be Hugh Jackman's last movie of the series.

Indeed, Jackman's retirement from the franchise created a huge buzz amongst the audience for 'Logan' and the movie has given a well-deserved farewell to the stunning actor.

So, here we bring you a quick review of Hugh Jackman's 'Logan' which has released hit the theatres today.

News18: Directed by James Mangold, Logan is a dark, gritty action-packed finale to the Wolverine franchise which was a spin-off of X-Men series. Unlike any other Marvel film, especially X-Men franchise whose last outing X-Men Apocalypse didn't go down really well on the story and execution front, Logan shines because of its intensity. The story is grim and remains so till the end. There is a looming sadness that builds up the narrative and keeps one engaged in the story. Full of blood and action, the thrill keeps you on the edge of your seat till the end. Coming to the performances, Hugh Jackman is at his best in his last Wolverine journey. 

Livemint: A fitting requiem to the most recognisable X-Man, James Mangold’s Logan gives the towering Hugh Jackman a vast canvas for his swansong. In the film, Logan, better known as the hirsute, iron-clawed Wolverine, is much weakened and weathered but no less violent. This curtain call spares no punches, but it does so with an emotional undercurrent. To Mangold’s credit, you don’t feel the running time of 140 minutes, and there’s something poignant about seeing an aging Logan losing his indestructibility and inching towards an inevitable end.

Firstpost: Prepare to be surprised because Logan is a violently nihilistic, at times quite depressing and also brutal social commentary on the current state of things in America. But more importantly, it’s the most perfect, emotionally resonant possible send-off to Hugh Jackman in his final performance as the titular character. As a bonus, director James Mangold, who is well versed with Westerns (he made the excellent 3:10 to Yuma) incorporates his love for the genre right into the heart of the film. And if your tear ducts tend to open easily you might want to carry some tissues to the theater and whip them out in the final act – which is a poignant goodbye to seventeen years of the Wolverine we knew, but also a tender look into the future for the franchise.

Associated Press:  'Logan' is not for the faint of heart _ not just because of its brutal violence, but because it packs an emotional wallop you don't typically expect from a comic-book movie. Featuring Hugh Jackman's final turn as Wolverine, `Logan' isn't a shiny, colorful, superhero-style film, either. It's gritty, dark, and a deeply satisfying conclusion for fans who've followed the clawed character through Jackman's past eight movie outings with the X-Men and alone as Wolverine. 

Times Of India: After 17 years of playing one of the most popular characters in the X-Men franchise, Hugh Jackman (Wolverine/ Logan) naturally has a lot riding on his hunky shoulders in Logan — the third and last installment in the solo Wolverine series. Don’t expect to see the X-Men in all their glory because the characters have aged and been through the fires. Xavier’s declining mental and physical health (he’s in his 90s now) and Logan’s ageing body almost make us feel sorry for the two characters. While Logan earns a living by driving a limousine, getting drunk and getting into fights, Xavier's disintegrating mind compels him to stay sedated in order to keep his colossal psychic powers under control. The film has a lot of gory scenes — there’s plenty of bloodshed thanks to Logan’s notorious adamantium claws — so be prepared. But what shines through the action are the number of emotional moments between the lead characters, making it the most moving film of the franchise so far.

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