UK teenager Miles Soloman corrects NASA data error

25 March 2017, 05:11 PM

A teenager in UK contacted NASA scientists to point out an error in a set of their own data. 17-year-old A-level student Miles Soloman at Tapton school in Sheffield found that International Space Station's (ISS) radiation sensors were recording false data. NASA appreciated Soloman's correction and they also invited him to analyse the problem.

The research was part of the TimPix project from the Institute for Research in Schools (IRIS), which provides students across the UK a chance to work on data from the space station, looking for patterns and anomalies that might lead to further discoveries. "I went straight to the bottom of the list and I went for the lowest bits of energy there were," Soloman was quoted as saying by BBC News.During UK astronaut Tim Peake's stay on the station, detectors started recording the radiation levels on the ISS.

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Miles noticed that a negative reading was being recorded when nothing hit the detector.Soloman and Miles's teacher and head of physics, James O'Neill contacted NASA regarding the negative energy. Although NASA claimed that it knew about the error, but believed it was happening once or twice a year. However, Soloman had found that it was happening multiple times a day.

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First Published: Saturday, March 25, 2017 04:45 PM
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