Pakistan PM launches massive tree-plantation drive in Haripur

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New Delhi:

In a move to make ‘Green Pakistan’, Prime Minister Imran Khan on Sunday launched a nationwide tree-plantation drive in Haripur near Islamabad, the officials said.

The campaign, as part of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf’s billion tree ‘Tsunami 2018’ drive, aims to plant 10 billion saplings across the country in the next five years, it said.

Today we launch our tree plantation drive #Plant4Pakistan across the entire country,” he said in a message on Twitter.

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“I want everyone to join this #GreenPakistan drive so we can counter the twin threats of climate change and pollution confronting our future generations,” Khan tweeted.

Today we launch our tree plantation drive #Plant4Pakistan across the entire country. I want everyone to join this #GreenPakistan drive so we can counter the twin threats of climate change and pollution confronting our future generations.

— Imran Khan (@ImranKhanPTI) September 2, 2018

The government said that 1.5 million saplings were planted on the first day under the initiative.

As part of the ‘Plant 4 Pakistan’ drive, free saplings were distributed at 200 distribution centres across the country, official said.

Talking to media after launching the plantation drive, Khan said that Pakistan would become a desert if timely action was not taken to plant trees.

According to a statement, the purpose of the campaign is to encourage people, communities, organisations, business and industry, civil organisations and government to collectively plant trees and to safeguard the ‘mother earth’.

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According to experts, Pakistan is facing enormous threats of environmental issues.

Meanwhile, a survey conducted by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute ahead of the 2018 poll found that respondents prioritized three key environmental issues: rising temperatures, water shortages, and air pollution.

(With inputs from agencies)

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