India To Use ‘Right To Reply’ At UNGA Against Imran Khan’s Rant On Kashmir

New Delhi, News Nation Bureau | Updated : 28 September 2019, 12:23 AM
Indian delegates at the United Nations General Assembly (Image Credit: ANI)
Indian delegates at the United Nations General Assembly (Image Credit: ANI)

India will use the Right to Reply option at the UN General Assembly (UNGA) in response to Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan's speech in which he targeted India over Kashmir and warned of another Pulwama like attack once the clampdown in the Valley is lifted. The Right of Reply generally means the right to defend oneself against criticism in the same venue where it was made.

“Has PM Modi thought what would happen when the curfew in Kashmir is lifted? Do you think people in Kashmir would accept that you have withdrawn the special status? Thousands of children in Kashmir have been put under detention. They, too, will come out on the streets after the curfew in the state is lifted and the Army will shoot them,” Imran Khan had said.

This was Imran’s maiden speech to the UNGA and he went on for about 50 minutes, far exceeding the 15-20-minute time limit that leaders are expected to adhere to while making their national statements during the busiest time in the United Nations Headquarters.

Out of the 50-minutes that he spoke from the podium of the UN General Assembly hall, half of his speech was on India and Kashmir, drumming up a hysteria about a nuclear war.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who was the fourth leader to address the General Assembly on Friday, spoke for about 16 minutes, succinctly talking about India's development agenda and the country's focus on initiating ambitious programmes aimed at improving the lives of not only the 1.3 billion people of India but serving as an example to nations and citizens across the world.

According to information about the high-level UN General Assembly session, a voluntary 15-minute time limit for statements is to be observed in the General Debate.

Member States are informed by a note verbale from the Secretary-General at the end of May that the speakers list for the general debate is formally opened for signing up. The speaking order of the general debate is different from the speaking order of other General Assembly debates.

Heads of State and Governments and Foreign Ministers from all the 193 UN Member States speak during the General Debate segment that usually lasts for 7-8 working days.

The longest timed speech was made by Fidel Castro of Cuba at the 872nd plenary meeting of the General Assembly on September 26, 1960. The time listed is 269 minutes.

With PTI Inputs

First Published: Saturday, September 28, 2019 12:20 AM

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