What is #KuToo Campaign? Japanese minister says wearing high heels at work are “necessary and appropriate”

New Delhi, News Nation Bureau | Updated : 07 June 2019, 11:24 AM
 #KuToo Campaign a hit in Japan (Photo: Instagram)
#KuToo Campaign a hit in Japan (Photo: Instagram)

High heels as been found by studies makes a person wearing it more confident, but what if we told you that to wear one such is, but, out of compulsion? The debate of whether high heels should be made mandatory at work place for women has been around for quite some time now. In 2017, the story of one London receptionist, Nicola Thorp caused a nationwide furore after she was ‘fired’ for refusing to wear high heels at work. Following the bogus reason of her ‘fire’ she went on to challenge the British government that soon gained worldwide attention about the sexist dress codes and discrimination at workplaces.

An online campaign under the hashtag #KuToo, a Japanese word which is a derivation for shoe, “kutsu”, and “kutsuu” meaning ‘pain’ seeks a ban on requiring women to wear high heels at work has been amassing a lot of worldwide attention. The petition launched by actress and freelance writer Yumi Ishikawa has reportedly collected over 21,000 online signatures and still growing, was submitted on Monday to the health ministry. The a 32-year-old funeral parlor worker who started the movement back in January when she tweeted about her frustration with the dress code, which says women had to wear high heels told The Associated Press news agency on Wednesday.

"This is about gender discrimination. It's the view that appearances are more important for women at work than for men’’.

Japan’s health minister, Takumi Nemoto, however is of the opinion of making high heels mandatory for women at work. Replying to the #KuToo Campaign, Health Minister Takumi Nemoto on Wednesday said, "It's generally accepted by society that (wearing high heels) is necessary and reasonable in workplaces," during a Diet committee session.

"I like my job right now but wearing pumps is really so hard," one of her tweets said. "Of course, if you want to wear them, please go ahead’’ she tweeted.

Taking the campaign as a way to raise awareness about sexism and gender inequality at work, Ishikawa says that, through the movement she hopes to win over fashion designers to make more comfortable footwear that is acceptable as formal wear.

First Published: Friday, June 07, 2019 11:22 AM
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