How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India

How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
Culturally rich India has its own way to celebrate New Year’s day at different times of the year at different places. Every region in India follow different cultures, so the traditions of the new year’s day celebration also vary. Generally, the new year is celebrated in different states of India at the time of harvesting of crops, This is the same day which celebrates at other regions of India with different names as Gudi Padwa, Baisakhi, Cheiraoba – Manipur and Diwali – Marwari New Year
How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
The Nabo Barsho of Bengal is celebrated with great deal of enthusiasm and energy during the mid of April. This is the day of cultural programs, Bengali delicacies, opening a new account at shops and an auspicious time for marriages.
How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
The traditional Tamil new year starts on mid-April either on 13 or 14 April, or first day of Tamil month Chithirai. The day is celebrated in the Meenakshi Temple Madurai with breat pomp. People wish each other “Puthandu Vazthukal” which means Happy New Year and Chitterai Thiruvizha . The main food of this festival is Mangai Pachadi, made of raw mangoes, jaggery and neem flowers.
How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
Assam's spring festival “Bohag Bihu” celebrated in the middle of April as the beginning season of agriculture. Assamese women clad in mekhla chador dance to Assamese folk songs and cuisine of Assam. Bohag Bihu is the biggest festival of Assam. The farmers prepare the fields for cultivation of paddy, while the women make pitha, larus (traditional food made of rice and coconut) and jolpan.
How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
Vishu is similar to the New Year festivals observed elsewhere in India, usually on April 14 of the Gregorian calendar. The most important event of the festival is “Vishukkani” means the first object viewed in the morning.
How the harvest festival represents diverse colours and cultures of India
The traditional Tamil new year starts on mid-April either on 13 or 14 April, or first day of Tamil month Chithirai. The day is celebrated in the Meenakshi Temple Madurai with breat pomp. People wish each other “Puthandu Vazthukal” which means Happy New Year and Chitterai Thiruvizha . The main food of this festival is Mangai Pachadi, made of raw mangoes, jaggery and neem flowers.