Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

Biting the medal is an iconic photo from every Olympics. The gold medal winner, with the flag draped across their shoulders sinking their teeth into the gold medal. But why do they do it? Olympic winners bite their medals as symbolism and to give photographers a pose to capture besides just smiles. In 2010, German luger David Moeller chipped his tooth while posing with his silver medal at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver. According to Rio 2016, the gold medals are free of mercury and “have been made with sustainability at their heart.”

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

A classic Michael Phelps performance at the Rio Olympics ended the swimming legend's career with 23 Olympic gold medals. Phelps is an American competitive swimmer and the most decorated Olympian of all time, with a total of 28 medals.

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

Mireia Belmonte won the 200 metres butterfly to become the first Spanish woman to win an Olympic swimming gold medal.

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

America’s Olympic golden girl Simone Biles finished the gymnastics competition as she should, winning Olympic gold medal. The 19-year-old gymnastics powerhouse performed a stunning tumbling routine on the floor, scoring an incredibly high 15.966.

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

Khasan Khalmurzaev has earned Russia's second judo gold medal of the Rio Olympic Games, beating Travis Stevens of the United States in the men's 81-kilogram category.

Rio Olympics 2016: Why do Olympic winners bite their medals?

Carolina Marin overhauled brave PV Sindhu in the women's singles final on Friday to win Spain's first badminton title and crush India's hopes of a maiden gold medal at the Rio Olympics.