Is There A Black Hole That Accounts For Orbits Observed In Distant Solar System?

New Delhi, News Nation Bureau | Updated : 01 October 2019, 09:08 AM
Primordial black holes originate from gravitational perturbations in the very early universe
Primordial black holes originate from gravitational perturbations in the very early universe

In space, there are millions of celestial bodies including asteroids, meteors, comets, black holes and UFOs about which we really don’t know much. A paper published on the arXiv preprint server this week predicted that a hypothetical object called a primordial black hole (PBH) could account for the odd orbits observed in the distant solar system and it can be from the dawn of the universe. The paper has been co-authored by Jakub Scholtz and James Unwin. Primordial black holes originate from gravitational perturbations in the very early universe, within one second after the Big Bang.

“A solution with an ordinary planet and a solution with an exotic compact object like a primordial black hole are very similar,” Vice news quoted Unwin, who is an assistant professor and theoretical particle physicist at the University of Illinois at Chicago as saying.

“However, the search strategy you need to identify [a black hole] is drastically different,” he added. “We're not currently using all the tools in our toolbox to search for this thing.”

“For normal black holes, you need to have at least a solar mass because it is created out of a star,” said Scholtz, who is a junior research fellow at the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology at Durham University. “These primordial black holes can be much lighter; for example, an Earth mass, or in fact, even lighter.”

Talking specifically about black holes, it is a region of space-time exhibiting gravitational acceleration so strong that nothing—no particles or even electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from it. In the space, black holes are one of the most complex entities.

Recently, News Nation apprised you with the supermassive black hole named V616 Monocerotis, which is the closest to our Earth at a distance of just 3,300 light-years away. It is worth mentioning here that supermassive black holes like V616 are monstrous wells of gravity, typically found at the dead centre of galaxies. And now, a study by Japanese astrophysicists that there could be up to 100 million black holes hiding throughout the Milky Way.

First Published: Tuesday, October 01, 2019 09:04 AM
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