NASA's Hubble telescope captures spiral galaxy in 'full bloom' 70 million light-years from earth

New Delhi, News Nation Bureau | Updated : 09 July 2019, 04:15 PM
NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope Picture of the Week. Image: Hubble/NASA/ESA
NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope Picture of the Week. Image: Hubble/NASA/ESA

The latest image released from the Hubble Space Telescope captured the bright colors of star formation in the galaxy. Those pockets of activity strongly resemble blooming roses amid the darkness.

The imaga was explained by NASA saying that the orange-pink glow is created after hydrogen gas reacted to the intense light streaming outwards from nearby newborn stars. In the new Hubble image, hydrogen gas can be seen reacting with the bright light streams from new stars close by, which creates the telltale orange glow.

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NASA has further elaborated on the factors of a galaxy influencing newly born stars and vice versa like - gravity, radiation, matter, and dark matter.

"New generations of stars contribute to — and are also, in turn, influenced by — the broader forces and factors that mold galaxies throughout the universe, such as gravity, radiation, matter, and dark matter," states NASA.

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In April 2019, Hubble scientists commemorated the gloriously successful telescope turning 29 with an annual release of a heavenly, haunting photograph it captured the same year. This year's subject was none other than the festive and very colourful-looking Southern Crab Nebula, with its tentacle-like extensions and peculiar hourglass shape.

When new star formation is observed, astronomers can also study how that affected the space around the galaxy. In turn, a galaxy's environment -- the surrounding gravity, matter, radiation and dark matter -- helps shape it.

First Published: Tuesday, July 09, 2019 04:11 PM
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