Pakistan Army terms Kashmir as nuclear flashpoint amid 'no first use' policy debate

Delhi, News Nation Bureau | Updated : 18 August 2019, 11:04 AM
India and Pakistan have been embroiled in high-stake war of words ever since the Narendra Modi government abrogated Article 370 that gave special powers to Jammu and Kashmir. (File Photo)
India and Pakistan have been embroiled in high-stake war of words ever since the Narendra Modi government abrogated Article 370 that gave special powers to Jammu and Kashmir. (File Photo)

Continuing its anti-India tirade, the Pakistan Army has termed Kashmir as ‘nuclear flashpoint.’ Addressing media on Saturday, Pakistan Army spokesperson Major General Asif Ghafoor said that, “Kashmir issue is nuclear flashpoint…. We have apprehension that India can launch attack to divert attention but we are fully prepared to deal with any misadventure.” The comment is seen by the expert as yet another attempt by Islamabad to internationalise the Kashmir issue. The ‘flashpoint’ remark comes after Indian Home Minister Rajnath Singh reportedly said that, “Till today, our nuclear policy is 'No First Use'. What happens in future depends on the circumstances."

The remark sparked massive speculations with many suggesting that India was revising its ‘no first use’ policy. India and Pakistan have been embroiled in high-stake war of words ever since the Narendra Modi government abrogated Article 370 that gave special powers to Jammu and Kashmir.

Earlier, Pakistan’s attempt to drag international community in the Kashmir issue failed miserably on Friday as the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) suggested bilateral route to resolve the dispute. Pakistan, in a desperate attempt after India’s move to remove provisions of Article 370 in Kashmir, had taken up the issue before the UNSC with the help of China, seeking the world body's interference.

However, during the closed-door meeting of the world’s highest diplomatic forum, it was suggested the issue should be resolved bilaterally. The informal meeting was held to decide whether there should be a formal meeting on the issue.

Although it was not known what was decided during the meeting, but according to reports, except China, no other member country supported Pakistan. This means it is highly unlikely that the UNSC will pass any resolution on Kashmir or call a formal meeting over the issue.

Although China did support Pakistan in arranging the informal meet, the backing was half-hearted as Beijing also said that any decision on Kashmir should be bilateral. Had China wanted, it could have used it veto and get a resolution passed on Kashmir.

However, China asked Pakistan to write to the council itself and just forwarded its request. China did this because it knew all other members of the UNSC favours India and Beijing did not want to face embarrassment of a defeat at the highest diplomatic forum.

First Published: Sunday, August 18, 2019 10:40 AM
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